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Thread: how many times can u split cable w/ 2-3 way splitter?

  1. #1
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    how many times can u split cable w/ 2-3 way splitter?

    So i have 1 cable jack leading to computer area that currently has a 1->2 splitter so my tv and cable modem have a connection. Any issues adding another 1->2 splitter to make 3 total lines?

  2. #2
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    It all depends on the signal strength prior to your first splitter.
    I would buy a splitter that has the number of outputs that you need.
    a 1 to 4 way splitter will knock off 7db.
    If the signal is not good enough, you can always use a signal amp.

    Splitters can be purchased at most electronic stores / Walmart if you have one near you.
    Or you can go to your cable company "lobby" and ask for one (at least I can at mine).
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  3. #3
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    There shouldn't be a problem as long as you make sure there is only one splitter in the line going to the cable modem. More than that and you run the risk of a poor modem connection, drop outs, etc.
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  4. #4
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    As Azimuth says, you're better off with one splitter that splits 4 ways instead of connecting 2 that each to 1-> 2. You'll see the cumulative drop in signal is less. That said, if you have a good signal coming in your can split it several times.

    I have a 1->3 way split when mine comes in the house, sending one to the cable modem, one to my living room and one into another 6 way splitter that feeds all the other bedrooms. The one line to the living room then is split again with a 3 way, feeding two cable boxes and one analog input to my PVR. These and the bedroom drops are all fine.

    If you need an amp, get your cable company involved. They will only install quality equipment and have the hardware to check the signal thoroughly. Right when I moved into my house I tried to amp my line since I knew I'd be running a lot of cable and figured I'd rather amp now instead of waiting until I had trouble. I tried 2 or 3 from various hardware stores and all added more interference to the line than I had without the amp. If you're going to be driving a cable modem and cable boxes, you really need a quality amp if you need on at all.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azimuth View Post
    It all depends on the signal strength prior to your first splitter.
    I would buy a splitter that has the number of outputs that you need.
    a 1 to 4 way splitter will knock off 7db.
    If the signal is not good enough, you can always use a signal amp.

    Splitters can be purchased at most electronic stores / Walmart if you have one near you.
    Or you can go to your cable company "lobby" and ask for one (at least I can at mine).
    how much are teh 1->3 or 1->4 splitters is there a noticeable difference in signal? i think there's an amplifer in the cable closet...coax gets pluged into an adaptor that is plugged to the wall outlet.

    only reason why i was gonna use two 1->2 splitters (for a total of 3 jacks) is that i have an extra one lying around and can get 1->2 splitters free from cable co.

  6. #6
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    try it.... it will probably work fine...but check the quality if there is a dropoff..
    and there are some better quality splitters than others, but even ones from the dollar store work for me...lol

    it all depends on the cable's quality from the wall...might,might not work..
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  7. #7
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    If you already have an amplifier, you should get your cable company out to test the signal. Too much amplification or spectrum imbalance can cause just as many problems as too much loss.
    A cable tech can make sure you have the right signal levels across all frequencies.

    An 1-2 splitter will result in 3.5db loss.

    I guess you could try adding the splitter, but you will not know if you have optimum performance without a service call.
    and as Jbyram2 said, place the modem after the first splitter.
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  8. #8
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    Just a note from personal experience - it's not necessarily the number of splits that counts, it's the total length of the runs. If you have a really long coax cable, you can suffer quite a bit of signal degradation. I rent, and the landlord has split the cable signal 4-ways, but each cable runs for >50'. We needed signal amplification, and I found I needed 2 amplifiers: one at the intial split and one more after that. Not ideal, but works. If you have short runs, you might get away with 1->3 or 1->4 splits, but if you are going to attach long runs, say 25'+, you might want to consider amplification.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hbien View Post
    Just a note from personal experience - it's not necessarily the number of splits that counts, it's the total length of the runs. If you have a really long coax cable, you can suffer quite a bit of signal degradation. I rent, and the landlord has split the cable signal 4-ways, but each cable runs for >50'. We needed signal amplification, and I found I needed 2 amplifiers: one at the intial split and one more after that. Not ideal, but works. If you have short runs, you might get away with 1->3 or 1->4 splits, but if you are going to attach long runs, say 25'+, you might want to consider amplification.
    Usually if you use high quality cable this is much less of an issue. Rg6 is far superior to the rg59 that the cable companies sometimes use. Rg6 is far better over long runs and for keeping signals from leaking in or out of the cable. Worth the extra cost.

    Also making sure the ends are crimped well can make a big difference in loss as well as making sure the cable is screwed in tightly.

    Splitters. I ended up using a fairly nice amplified splitter to get an 8 port split. The noise figure of the amp in the splitter is the limiting factor since it boosts the power up substantially to make up for the ensuing splitter loss, but the noise figure of the amp degrades the incoming signal. In other words - the lower the NF of an amplfied splitter (or anything for that matter) the better the results.
    I could only split the cable modem port once before it stopped working.

  10. #10
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    Remember, unlike your TV or PVR the cable modem is a bidirectional device so any splitter will attenuate the return channel signal (which you have no easy way to determine the impact of) and also any amplifier needs to have a return channel path through it.

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